Home Brew maybe a show can be made

Has everybody here heard of Home Brew, it is a Linux based package manager for your Mac. Also, it offers a tone of great terminal based software.

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I use brew frequently! As always though, we need to find an automation angle that’s friendly to a good chunk of our audience :wink:

Well… I do have a script that I use via launchd to keep brew up to date, but that’s definitely not an entire show.

However, now that it also has the ability to automate app installations too, I suppose it could be part of a “Setting up a new Mac” automation show?

Could also do a show (or part thereof) about some of the tools it includes that can help with automation, such as:

  • blueutil for controlling Bluetooth
  • brightness I bet you can guess what this one does
  • contacts which I use to remind myself of friends’ birthdays
  • dropbox-uploader will not only upload to Dropbox but get you a share link
  • html2text for trying to convert HTML to markdown
  • icalBuddy which is handy for getting calendar info into scripts
  • jq for dealing with json
  • lynx which is awesome for processing web pages in scripts
  • mas for installing Mac App Store apps from the command line.
  • multimarkdown for making markdown into HTML
  • pdfgrep for searching for text inside PDFs
  • rsync is great for sending files to other computers and is much more up-to-date than the version that ships with macOS
  • tag, for, well, tagging (I use that with some automated scripts and Hazel)
  • terminal-notifier which is like Growl but for Notification Center
  • trash (which is the best way to “delete” files with shell scripts and also supports the “Put Back” feature of the Trash)
  • wget which is great for downloading files
  • wifi-password for getting the password to your current Wi-Fi network
  • youtube-dl for downloading from YouTube and lots of other sites

Just some ideas.

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At work we use Homebrew in Chef recipes to automatically set up new build slaves (Mac mini’s) to exactly the state we want.

But I guess this is only interesting to a very small group of people.

At home & work I additionally use Homebrew without Chef to install tools and keep them (semi-automatically) up-to-date on my own machines.

I just tried:

It’s pretty cool!

@rob what do you mean by:

What is Chef? I’ve never heard of it.

it’s a deployment platform.

Almost the entirety of the setup of a new computer occurs for me through a Brewfile. I use brew but it’s also great to be able to use brew cask and mas to install/update almost every GUI app I have on my computer.

Sorry, I thought I had used a proper link to their website in my post, but apparently the “protocol” (http/https) was missing (fixed it now).

It’s indeed a deployment platform.

Are there other package managers, command line apps, or command line tips and tricks that I should be aware of? Homebrew was a first for me and I absolutely love it. At first, I only used it to install a DRM remover patch for Handbrake for my own movies only.

What do you do to set up a new computer? Can you explain further or do you have a blog post about how to set up the Mac completely with Command Line Terminal?

I’ve put a blog post together here. But essentially, I’m leveraging https://github.com/Homebrew/homebrew-bundle and https://github.com/lra/mackup/

Also interesting https://github.com/mathiasbynens/dotfiles/blob/master/.macos

Not really. There is Mac Ports but Homebrew is better in a number of ways, and I’m not sure of any reason to use two of package managers.

Home Brew is essential if you use a lot of open source packages. It’s not Linux based, although it emulates the huge software libraries that Linux distributions tend to have. (Pet Peeve: people who think that the unix underpinnings of macOS mean that macOS is based on Linux rather than the BSD unix variants.)

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